Cupcake stand…

The (wedding) cupcake stand turned out really well. It’s designed to be easily altered. Click any image to enlarge it.


Here are the parts to the stand. The wood tiers are 28″, 24″, 20″, 16″, 12″, and 8″. There are two 10″ tiers as well that can be used for a bigger top tier and for a foot.


Put a washer and nut at one end of a 1/2″ threaded rod. The top (8″ or 10″) tier has a recessed center. Place that on the rod.


Build the stand upside-down. I used pvc couplers that are 4″ tall to separate the tiers. I covered them with pretty paper but they could be left white, covered with fabric, tulle – whatever fits the event. Steve cut wood centering disks that fit inside the couplers to hold the coupler in place.


Add as many tiers and couplers as you want to.


End with the larger centering disk and a washer and nut. This centering disk fits into the large pvc coupler that I’m using for a foot in the photo below.


And there it is! The edges of the tiers can be left plain or covered with ribbon or strips of decorative paper. This configuration stands 29 1/2″ tall and should hold LOTS of cupcakes. Celia, Rachel – I hope this is going to work for you!

Ring bearer pillow….

I finished a ring bearer pillow for Celia and Jeff’s wedding. The colors for their August 15th wedding are brown and green so this fits right in.

I made the pillow 10″ x 10″. It’s big enough that the child who carries it will be unlikely to play with it. It’s easy to hold on to. It’s also big enough to use as a decorative pillow after the wedding.

That’s my boy (one of them anyway)….

Jeff, our youngest, is working on a PhD in biostatistics at Johns Hopkins. The first paper on which he is lead author has been posted! It is part of a collection of working papers, and it has been submitted to the annals of applied statistics. As he says, “fun times!”

That’s Jeff, thinking deep thoughts, with Sugar the cat.

Drawing circles…

Steve started working on the cupcake stand for Jeff and Celia’s wedding today. He bought a sheet of 1/2″ birch-veneer plywood and cut circles for each tier. The largest is 28″ in diameter, the smallest is 8″.

He made a great big compass to draw the circles but that wasn’t working so well. I remembered that I had a flexible plastic knitting ruler that could work better.

Steve put some small holes down the center of the ruler. He anchored the ruler in place with a finish nail at the 1″ mark. He put the pencil in a small hole to draw the size circle he wanted. This is a really easy way to draw great big circles.

Steve cut the circles with a band saw. He then cut 4″ and 6″ lengths of pvc pipe to separate the tiers. He drilled a hole in the center of each wood circle. A threaded pipe run through the center with a washer and nut at each end will cinch the whole thing together. Steve is going to rout indentations for the washer and nut.

This should be a very flexible serving piece. I’m going to paint the wood pieces white this week. The edges of each tier and the pvc pipe can be decorated with pretty paper or ribbon to suit any occasion. Our niece, Rachel, is also going to use it at her wedding – and in her catering business. I’ll post finished pictures in a few days.

Stimulus spending…

I did some shopping when I wasn’t busy teaching last weekend. Der Kuchen Laden is a well-stocked kitchen shop in Fredericksburg, TX. I got all sorts of little doo-dads. The notched triangular tool for leaving lines in icing should be lots of fun to use on cakes.

Down the street Linens-N-More was about to close so I wasn’t able to shop long. Probably a good thing. I got this wonderful silk screened “America” dish towel made by Catstudio. I don’t know that I’m going to be able to let anyone get it wet – it may have to be a pillow. It could also be good in a quilt or garment.

In Kerrville, I found my way to Creations – one of the best quilt shops I’ve ever visited! This is the fabric I came home with. I also bought some wool for Linda, a linen jacket (for me), and upholstery fabric for my dining room chairs – oh happy day! It’s probably good for my wallet that I’m home now.

Cedar fences…

I found fences made from freshly cut cedar too! I want to put a fence like this around my backyard so it was exciting to find these.
This fence was “doubled” – there were cedar posts on both sides of the iron rebar supports.

The “single” fence had cedar posts wired to only one side of the rebar. The posts that hold the fence up are iron pipe filled with concrete. It looks like they used galvanized wire to tie the cedar to the rebar.

I wonder how long these fences will last before the iron parts rust through? Have any of you constructed similar fences?