Photos from Salzburg…

We took the subway (the U-Bahn) to the main train station (the Hauptbahnhof) where we caught a train to Salzburg. Jeff navigated the subway and train systems for us. He and Celia both are from NYC and it didn’t take long for them to figure it out. It took Steve and I a bit longer.

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photo by celia goldsmith

Salzburg is beautiful. The old part of the city, called Getreidegasse, is overlooked by the Hehensalzburg Fortress. It is easy to spot from just about anywhere in the city. I took the next photo from the Mirabell Palace Garden.

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We were only in Salzburg for 1 1/2 days. We walked through the Mirabell Garden on our way to the hotel. We (and just about everyone else) took pictures, with both cameras and iPhones. But I have to say that it’s an eye-opener to see so many people ignoring what’s right in front of them in favor of their device. I try not to do that so much.

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Our hotel, the Blaue Gans Arthotel (which was truly wonderful!), is on this street:

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The business signs are much like the decorations you see on Bavarian maypoles, but bigger and fancier. The blue goose (blaue gans) is the sign for our hotel.

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After checking in, we went up to the cafe at the Museum of Modern Art which is located at the top of Mount Mönchsberg. The views are spectacular! That’s the Fortress in the distance.

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The structures and vehicles almost look like toys.

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More tomorrow…

Photos from Munich…

I could be just like that person back in the day who would show hundreds of slides from their vacation to unlucky and completely bored family and friends. I did, indeed, take nearly 1,000 pictures but many were deleted and I promise to only show the best or most representative images.

This is a Maypole:

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This one is from outside of Munich, but you can find maypoles all over Bavaria (the southern region in Germany). Click here to read more about the tradition but what I learned from Mario, our tour guide to Neuschwanstein, is that every community has a maypole and they are usually painted in blue or blue and white (the colors of Bavaria). The decorations on the maypole represent different guilds, businesses, or organizations in the town.

One thing I noticed right away, and kept appreciating, is that Germany is clean and tidy. You often have to pay to use public restrooms, but that money pays for people who are there to clean after every use. Let me just say that it was really nice. I notice in looking back at pictures of the city that the streets are clear of trash. Maybe I was just in the nice parts?

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The other thing that hit me is just how new America is. It was not unusual to see buildings dated to the 1300 or 1400s and there were many older than that. Columbus didn’t get here until 1492!* Many buildings were destroyed in WW2, but much that is old remains, and we took pictures of it :-).

*UPDATE: Marty commented that there were people and civilizations in North America before Columbus arrived and of course that is true. I should have been more specific. I meant that the architecture that I saw in Germany was not also in America at the same time. The peoples that lived here did not build these sorts of structures or, if they did, I’ve never seen any. Columbus came to mind because of the dates on the buildings and it is a pretty simple historical reference point.

I might also add the Neuschwanstein Castle was built around the time of our Civil War.

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This tall building in the photo below is the Rathaus (New Town Hall). The famous Glockenspiel is located in the center front of the tower. Every day at 11 a.m. (as well as 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. in summer) it chimes and re-enacts two stories from the 16th century. It consists of 43 bells and 32 life-sized figures and we were never there when it ran. (FYI: a glockenspiel is a musical instrument that has a line of flat metal bars of different sizes that are hit with two special sticks. I had to look that up.)

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I could show you many more photos of lovely old buildings, but then I’d be that person who never knows when to quit with the pictures :-).

We visited gardens! These photos are from the English Garden in Munich.

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This is a huge park. We were there on a sunny, warm day. It has been a cool and wet spring in Bavaria so there were lots of people out enjoying the park.

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I’ll post more tomorrow.

Show and tell…

This show and tell is from Raquel White who says:

My daughters name is Millie, and she wanted it for her 16th birthday ( then her…17th, 18th, 19th and 20th). Millie turns 21 this December and the quilt is completed. I purchased it in Rogers AR at The a Rabbits Lair in 2009.

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Raquel, you made a wonderful quilt that your daughter will always treasure. Congratulation! You gave her a tangible expression of your love :-).

From Munich…

We arrived after an overnight flight to Munich in the morning. We are staying in an apartment and got checked in by midday. Before long we were out walking around to see the sites. It was rainy, but nice. These shots were taken from the bell tower of St. Peter’s church.

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There are many, many churches in Munich and many of them are Catholic. I feel right at home :-).

Today we went on a tour to Neuschwanstein, the castle build by King Ludwig in Bavaria. I have wanted to see this castle since I was a girl so it was great fun and I do so appreciate Celia for finding the tour. Below is Mario, our guide.

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We stopped at two lovely churches, one Baroque and one Rococo, on the way to the castle.

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Neuschwanstein is the castle that Cinderella’s castle at Disneyworld is based on.

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If you are interested in the castle, you can find better photos than I took online. The best shots are from from the bridge behind the castle that is closed for repairs. Deep sighs on our part. No matter—it was a beautiful day, no rain, cool weather, and great company!

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We stopped for cheese, sausage, and beer at a cheese farm on the way back to Munich. I’ve never seen cows this color before… they were more taupe than brown. They all wore bells and it was fun to sit by them as we ate a late lunch.

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Tomorrow we head to Salzburg!

Kauai Road, off the wall…

Here it is, with the fabric cut and the overlay in place. The power lines are an important part of the design that will be added nearly at the end of the stitching.

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I’m going to sew all the shapes together by hand, mostly in an applique-ish sort of say. I took off all of the shapes that sit on top of the ‘background’.

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Next, I took it off of my design wall and almost had a disaster. Each shape had multiple pins sticking directly into the wall. I held the bottom of the muslin base layer and slowly pulled the whole thing off the wall. I’ve done this before and the pins held everything in place. This time, some pieces fell off or shifted. It happened so fast I couldn’t even swear at it :-).

I managed to get it on my dining room table, with all of the pieces back where I think they went. That took a little while. Next time I’ll pin much more securely before I take it off the wall.

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You might be wondering why I didn’t just glue the shapes in place. I don’t like glue, that’s why. I may change my mind at some point but for now, no glue for me.

Basting took a while but that’s OK. This project is not about speed, it’s more of a journey.

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Hand sewing this is going to take a while. I’ll post updates as it comes along.

In other news: Steve and I are with Celia and Jeff, in Munich! Watch Instragram and Facebook for news from our trip. I’ll share my best photos on the blog when I get home :-).

Kauai Road…

Having the line drawing of the palm trees and telephone poles helps a lot. All through this process, I could see how they would fill up the foreground. The sky, mountains, and bushes on the sides of the road are really background.

Once the mountains were in place, I went back to the road and began cutting fabric for the bushes and trees, but it was slow going. I then turned my attention to the sky, which is mostly cloudy. (It is, in fact, very often cloudy in this spot on Kauai.)

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Finding the right fabrics for the sky was hard!!!—so I went back to the greenery :-).

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There is a car in my photo, but it’s isn’t red. It needs to be red!

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After getting a lot of the foreground trees and poles cut, I went back to the sky. It was still hard, but I stuck with it. I did have to go buy some fat quarters which was a surprise. It’s getting closer to being ready to take off the wall!

 

Kauai Road, continued…

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Working with only a rough sketch and no pattern shapes is very different for me. In my applique life, I have drawn patterns that many of you have sewn. The pieces are specific, and numbered. You trace around the templates to make a shape that fits the pattern.

I have also worked in the manner of Ruth McDowell, where I started with a photo and generated a pattern on freezer paper. In this kind of quilt, you may hunt for the right fabric for a shape, but you have a pattern for that shape.

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As I work on Kauai Road, I’m thinking about so many things at once: What color do I need? What fabric do I have? What size or shape should each piece be? And on and on…A person can only make so many decisions before her brain has had enough. Even though this is fun, it’s a challenge. So why am I working this way?

I want to construct Kauai Road more in the manner of Edrica Huws. I have mentioned her work before, on this blog post. There’s not much documentation on her sewing methods, but in looking at her work I surmised that she was not strictly bound by a drawing, and that she cut shapes more or less intuitively, by hand, with scissors.

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I am learning new things as I work this way, and it’s invigorating!